Technology

Technology

In the Australian Curriculum, ICT is described as a general capability and is applied to all learning areas of the Curriculum. The capability involves students learning to make the most of the digital technologies available to them, adapting to new ways of doing things as technologies evolve and limiting the risks to themselves and others in a digital environment (ACARA, 2013).

The Melbourne Declaration on the Educational Goals for Young Australians (MCEETYA 2008) recognises that in a digital age, and with rapid and continuing changes in the ways that people share, use, develop and communicate with ICT, young people need to be highly skilled in its use. Students need the knowledge, skills and confidence to make ICT work for them at school, at home, at work and in their communities.

ICT is viewed as a connector across each of our communities and an enabler of learning.

The Wilcannia-Forbes Diocese recognises that learning is not fixed by time or place and that technology is becoming central to all learning (Kalantzis, Cope & The Learning by Design Group, 2005).

In January 2015, the CEO purchased Chromebooks for all students to support the use of Google apps (known as GSuite). Parents pay an annual levy for this system. To be sure that no one is financially disadvantaged this levy is recalculated annually. At the end of a three-year cycle, the Chromebook may be purchased for the student for a minimal fee.

All teachers continue to participate in professional learning and Information and Communication Technology Teachers (ICTTs) work closely with classroom teachers to support the integration of technology into all key learning areas.

Arts & Culture

Arts and Culture

“In the longer term, learning in the Creative Arts assists students in their lifelong learning in the visual arts, music, drama and dance. It also assists students to participate in and contribute to cultural life, to become informed consumers of the arts and culture, to empathise with others, and to consider a range of career paths. The Creative Arts also provide opportunities for students to respect the views of various social and cultural groups, people with different religions and belief systems and people with disabilities. The Creative Arts also offer opportunities for students to value the different perspectives of females and males.”
NSW Creative Arts Syllabus (2000)

Students are given the opportunity to participate in a variety of creative arts experiences that involve making, appreciating, performing, organising, listening and composing.

In addition to the Creative Arts syllabus, visual arts, music, drama and dance are integrated into other key learning areas. Our students are fortunate to be able to join in local NAIDOC Week celebrations as a time to apply their creative arts skills beyond the classroom.

Our communities invite schools to be involved in various functions and our school choirs often perform at local school and community events as well as participating in regional Eisteddfods.

School art shows provide our students with the opportunity to showcase their creative abilities, as does entry into other local and national art competitions.Students contribute to their local agricultural show by creating and exhibiting a variety of media.

Visiting performing artists and productions, provide our students with the experiences of enjoying live theatre and music. In our Western region schools, Moorambilla Voices helps uncover artistic excellence in regional children and youth.

Public speaking and debating competitions provide our students with the opportunities to develop confidence and to showcase their skills in these areas.